fbpx

Here are 7 questions to inspire you.

This is now the ideal time to put your thoughts on paper. Use this time to write.
If you are confident share your writing in the comments or join my group

Wordplay Writer’s Workshop and share it with the hashtag #writersblockinspiration

With thanks from Jerry Jenkins’s blog.  
1: Answer 3 Questions

See if these stimulate your thinking.

  • Who just entered your office?
  • What is he or she carrying?
  • What does he or she want?

2: WRITE A LETTER TO YOUR YOUNGER SELF

Tap into your emotions and imagine this as a real, separate person you might be able to move with your words.

3: IMAGINE A SCENE

An ex-love walks into a coffee shop but hasn’t yet noticed you. Should you greet them? What do you say to someone whose heart you broke five years ago?

You’re a child who’s been told Santa isn’t real. Write about your feelings and how you might interact with younger kids who still believe.

You find a peculiar device in your pocket and have no idea how it got there. You feel someone’s watching you. What do you do?

In fewer than 250 words, describe how a defining moment in your life made you a better person.

Write a story involving an invitation to the secret meeting of a huge activist group. What are they about, and why was your character invited?

Write about how your character’s best friend’s body shows up in front of their house. What will they do to find out who’s responsible?

4: WRITE A STORY SOMEONE ONCE TOLD YOU

Exercise your storytelling muscles.

5: WRITE FROM A NEW POINT OF VIEW

If you find yourself most often writing from the same perspective, try a different voice.

  • First-person (I, Me, My).
  • Second-person (You, Your). This POV is more common in non-fiction, rarely used by novelists.
  • Third-person limited (He, She). Common in commercial fiction, the narrator uses the main character as the camera.
  • Third-person omniscient. The narrator has access to the thoughts of ALL characters (not recommended except as a writing exercise).

6: WRITE ABOUT SOMEONE WHO INSPIRES YOU

  • a family member
  • a friend
  • a historical figure
  • a teacher
  • any hero of yours

Try writing a short story in first-person from their perspective.

7: WRITE ABOUT SOMEONE YOU KNOW

With this exercise, you create a story with a lead character based on a family member, best friend, or anyone else you know well.

Use their actual life to inspire the story.

Here’s hoping these writing exercises get you unstuck and producing like never before.
Join my group Wordplay Writer’s Workshop and share it with the hashtag #writersblockinspiration

You cannot copy content of this page